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COBRA – Consolidated Omnibus Budget Reconciliation Act

The Consolidated Omnibus Budget Reconciliation Act (COBRA) gives certain workers and their families who lose their health benefits the right to choose to continue group health benefits provided by their group health plan for limited periods of time under certain circumstances. These circumstances include voluntary or involuntary job loss, reduction in the hours worked, transition between jobs, death, divorce, and other life events.

On February 17, 2009, COBRA was amended as part of the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act (ARRA), often referred to as the Stimulus Bill. In order to comply with these changes, employers must act quickly to modify their contribution and send notices to employees eligible for COBRA due to an involuntary termination occurring between September 1, 2008 and December 31, 2009.

Attorneys at Gentry Locke serve employers with our counsel, governmental compliance assistance, and litigation experience for these and other matters relating to COBRA implementation.

Please click on the names below to view the bio pages of attorneys with experience in COBRA matters, representation of Management before federal agencies, and executive compensation and benefit issues:

 

Learn more about Government Agency Compliance

Department of Labor web pages on this topic

Learn more about Employment Benefits and Executive Compensation

Learn more about ERISA – the Employee Retirement Income Security Act

COBRA-related links:

 

Please note: This page is provided for informational purposes only and is a marketing publication of Gentry Locke Rakes & Moore, LLP. It is intended to alert recipients to developments in the law and is does not constitute legal advice or a legal opinion on any specific facts or circumstances. The contents are intended as general information only. You are urged to consult your own lawyer concerning your situation and specific legal questions you may have.

 

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